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Tag Archives: DMUs

  • London Traction by Hugh Llewelyn

    Class 52 C-C diesel hydraulic No.(D)1065 Western Consort prepares to leave Paddington in July 1975. (London Traction, Amberley Publishing)

    For me, London is without doubt the most interesting rail centre in the UK – it has the densest network of lines, the largest number of services, the greatest number of major termini and suburban stations and, above all, the greatest variety of traction.

    I have lived and worked in, commuted to and visited London and its environs since the 1950’s, although my interest in railways didn’t start until about 1960/61. Initially I had no camera to record what I saw and my knowledge of what I was looking at was hazy to say the least! But from 1962 I started taking photographs with a very basic Brownie 127, soon progressing to a Halina 35X Super (though it wasn’t very ‘super’) and eventually various SLR’s and DLSR’s.

    BREL/GEC Class 90 Bo-Bo No.90 042 in Freightliner two-tone grey rumbles past Carpenders Park on a Coatbridge - Felixstowe container Freightliner service on 2 July 2008. (London Traction, Amberley Publishing)

    My main interest in the early years was steam but, unlike most of my friends, not confined to that. My friends thought it a little treacherous that I photographed the early diesel locomotives – even the diesel hydraulics – that were replacing our beloved giants of steam. But they thought me mad to be exhibiting even a slight interest in DMUs and Southern EMUs; the latter as objects of interest was beyond their comprehension! But how glad I am that I ignored their bewilderment and peer pressure to photograph only steam – and preferably Great Western steam! Even though I have dreadful shots of LMS No.10001, DP2, 20001, 4-COR’s and 2-BIL’s because of my poor cameras (I always blame my tools), at least I have a record of them. Photographs of these classes do not feature in my book because of their poor quality but other shots of what might still be considered ‘gems’ in the traction world are included.

    Fast approaching Haringey on a Peterborough - King's Cross service on 12 May 2012 is ABB Class 365 ‘Networker Express’ 4-car Emu No.365 508 of First Capital Connect in ‘urban lights’ livery. (London Traction, Amberley Publishing)

    There are several pictures of diesel hydraulics, one of the ‘Blue Pullman’ (sadly a ‘near miss’ in preservation), BRC&W Class 30’s before they were re-engined and became Class 31’s, Baby Deltics, the short lived BTH and North British Type 1’s, the last ‘Bournemouth Belle’ and loco-hauled Moorgate/Kings cross commuter trains. Such photographs date from my youth in the years BC – Before Cids!

    Following the end of my student days in 1972, I left South Wales for East Sussex and my modest knowledge of Southern EMUs swelled immeasurably. A few years later, I moved to various northern and south western suburbs of London which led to me commuting on SR, LMR and ER EMUs into Victoria, Waterloo, Euston and Liverpool Street. This resulted in the growth of my interest in not just those termini but also the traction which got me there.

    The Dollands Moor-Hams Hall ‘Norfolk Line’ Intermodal service is hauled by Brush Class 56 3,250 hp Co-Co No.56 312 Artemis of Hanson in its unique purple livery on the 12 October 2009. (London Traction, Amberley Publishing)

    The locations of the photographs in my book reflect my favourite stations or ones which were convenient to visit at a particular time. Having been brought up in South Wales, inevitably Paddington and stations on the former Great Western lines were a firm favourite. But running close was Kings Cross. Although not as large or as spectacular as Paddington, Kings Cross is such an architecturally well-balanced building that I find it the most attractive London terminus. Moreover, although the uniquely-styled ‘Westerns’ remain my favourite diesel locomotives, the ‘Deltics’ were nonetheless a huge attraction – the most powerful diesel locomotives in the world at the time. Hence Paddington and Kings Cross are probably over-represented in my book.

    The era of HST’s and the electrified West Coast Main Line and East Coast Main Line added to the great variety of traction to photograph and again, some classes I found more interesting than others, most notably the HST’s and Class 90’s. These therefore tend to feature more in my book than others.

    There were periods when I was not working in London and rarely visited because of family and career commitments, so there are large gaps in the timeline of my railway photography there. It was only later in my career when I worked a lot in London (though based and living in Bristol) and after my retirement when I had more free time that I had the chance to enlarge my photographic collection of London traction.

    The changing nature of the traction and locations over the decades is evident in my book. And changes continue apace with the electrification of the Great Western Main Line and, maybe, the rebuilding of Euston as the London termini of HS2.

    Hugh Llewelyn's new book London Traction is available for purchase now.

  • Scottish Traction by Colin J. Howat

    Class 37403 (ED) “Isle Of Mull” at Oban ready to depart with a service to Glasgow Queen Street. Taken April 1985 (Author's collection)

    Moving on from my earlier books, Ayrshire and Strathclyde Traction, I have now delved deeper and further into my archives. Scottish Traction as the title suggests covers Scotland from Thurso in the far north to Gretna Junction in the south. I have also included a couple of shots of trains just south of Gretna.

    A lot has changed with the Scottish Traction scene since these days. At one time there was an extensive internal sleeper service within Scotland out with the main Anglo-Scottish services. I can remember travelling overnight from Glasgow Queen Street to Inverness and back and also travelling from Ayr to Carlisle. I even remember turning out at Ayr station at 4:30 in the morning to capture the last Stranraer bound sleeper working from London Euston (May 1991). However, disaster struck as my 35MM Chinon camera jammed and I lost the shot – every photographers’ nightmare. I did however, capture the last south bound working. The advent of low cost budget airlines and other developments put an end to these trains and most were withdrawn by the early 1990s.

    47610 (ED) arrives at Edinburgh with a service from Birmingham. Taken May 1982 (Author's collection)

    Scotland has a diverse range of scenery from the rolling flat countryside of the Nith Valley north of Dumfries, through the fantastic West Highlands to the remote fields of the Far North line north of Inverness,  all offering their own unique characteristics. I have included 3 images for this blog that are not included in the book but hopefully will give a taste of the main ingredients contained within it.

    As time has passed, the Traction has also changed. The old class 303 electric units long associated with the Glasgow area are now gone. However their successors, Class 314s, are almost 40 years old and are also expected to be withdrawn by 2019. Class 318 and 320s along with Class 334 and 380 units now cover the electric scene. DMUs are long gone but again their replacements, Class 156 and 158 units are almost 30 years of age as well.

    Class 47 crosses the River Tay just outside Perth station on the single line to Barnhill with a London Euston to Aberdeen service. Taken August 1981 (Author's collection)

    With the impending electrification of the Glasgow Queen Street to Edinburgh via Falkirk High route expected to start at the end of 2017, this will trigger another cascade of traction with more Class 170 DMUs expected to be diagrammed onto the new Border Railway. The new electric Class 385 Hitachi units are expected to dominate the Central area for the next 30 plus years but are still to be tested out. Freight unfortunately has fallen to an all time low. Coal traffic is only a shadow of the past and container traffic looks like the future as in England it is increasing gradually. I would expect further lines around the Central belt to be electrified as the government wishes to cut emissions. As the old saying states “Nothing stays still” and I expect the changing rail scene to continue on.

    Colin J. Howat's new book Scottish Traction is available for purchase now.

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