Amberley Blog

  1. Cranborne Chase – A Secret Landscape by Roger Lane

    Cranborne Chase – A Secret Landscape is published this month (June 2015) providing me with the end result of many years of deliberation and two years of research, writing and photography. Most pleasing however, is the coincidental launch of the book with two important events embracing Cranborne Chase in relation to its history and landscape. The historical element concerns the...
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  2. Agincourt - June 1415: England prepares for war by W.B. Bartlett

    The Battle of Agincourt through the eyes of key participants - June 1415. The plans were all in place, the invasion army was assembling, the ports of southern England were full of ships and sailors. Vast amounts of supplies had been collected, as the fleet looked south across the English Channel towards the beaches of Normandy. Everyone hoped that the...
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  3. Waterloo Anniversary by Martyn Beardsley

    Exactly two hundred years ago today, at the time I'm writing this - early on the morning of the 18th June - two armies just a few hundred yards apart were making the final preparations for a battle for the future of Europe - Waterloo. Weapons were cleaned, ammunition was checked, and horses were saddled and fed. British soldiers, stiff...
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  4. What Did Cambronne Say at Waterloo? by Mark Simner

    There are many myths and controversies surrounding the Battle of Waterloo, fought on 18 June 1815. Indeed, a number of books have been written that solely focus on these fascinating, yet sometimes frustrating, aspects of the Hundred Days campaign. Some of these myths have since been proved false or otherwise finally laid to rest, but many persist, with military history...
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  5. The Suffrage movement in WWI by Mavis Curtis

    When I started writing my book about the Women’s Institute I did a lot of reading about the suffrage movement. I was surprised to find that many of the women who had been active suffragists, such as Grace Hadow, were among the first people to set up and run branches of the WI. Generally speaking, they were suffragists, not suffragettes...
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  6. Gillian Polack & Katrin Kania - How they got interested in the Middle Ages

    Here the authors talk about what got them interested in the Middle Ages. Gillian Polack I often tell people that I fell into the Middle Ages almost by mistake. I had a question I wanted to answer and the Middle Ages held that answer. Sounds good, doesn’t it? The sad truth is that life is more complicated than that. Here’s...
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  7. The Battle of Lewes, 14th May 1264, by Darren Baker author of With All for All: The Life of Simon de Montfort

    14th May marks the anniversary of one of those events which most people in England have probably never heard of and yet which has influenced how they live their lives today. On this day in 1264 an army under Simon de Montfort defeated and captured King Henry III in and around the town of Lewes, Sussex. Under the resulting peace treaty...
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  8. England’s Reigning Queens, by Elizabeth Norton

    Some of England’s (and later, Britain’s) most memorable monarchs have been queens. It is therefore surprising that only eight women can claim to have ruled as reigning queen in the post-Conquest period and, then, only six effectively. As our current queen approaches Queen Victoria’s record of longest reigning monarch, let’s look at some of the key female rulers who came...
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  9. The Lusitania: Remembering A Legend, by J. Kent Layton

    Saturday, 1 May 1915 dawned in New York City depressingly overcast, drizzly, and decidedly not like the spring weather the calendar indicated it should have been. At the Lower West Side of Manhattan's Chelsea Piers, partially obscured by yet towering over the blocks-long face of the pier buildings, stood a quartet of dark smokestacks. Locals knew better than anyone else...
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  10. Manchester City Have No History, by Mike Devlin

    It matters not that they were created from the ashes on the 16th of April 1894, or that they were in fact around as early as 1880 in some form or another (not that the media of the day could remember what the club was called) – or indeed earlier if we include cricket, but that isn’t a real sport...
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