Amberley Blog

  1. Dining with the Victorians Daily Express feature by Emma Kay

    Making a meal of it: How the Victorians influenced your eating habits From a cooked breakfast to our love of curries, many of Britain's familiar culinary habits were invented by the Victorians as a new book reveals. Dining With The Victorians explores the impact they had on our eating habits today SUPERSTITIONS Many Victorians had an inexplicable obsession with the...
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  2. The Georgian Kitchen by Emma Kay

    I wrote the Georgian Kitchen to tell the story of my conviction in Britain’s cooking culture forming during this period. This was a time of extraordinary change in Britain, when the country became a vastly powerful world entity; a wealthy, extravagant and culinary rich nation. Conflict, poverty and sea power led many migrants to British shores. As well as importing...
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  3. Dining with the Victorians by Emma Kay

    Dining with the Victorians explores the narrative of the history of cooking, eating, wining and dining in this fact packed follow-up to Dining with the Georgians, my first book that defined Britain’s contemporary culinary history as being largely established in the eighteenth century. Whereas the Georgians gave us celebrity chef culture, a recipe writing mass media and a culinary consumerist...
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  4. The Empress, the War and the Old Boy Network by Gareth Russell

    In political terms, the life of Zita of Bourbon-Parma was one of the great, if noble, failures in European history. To date the last Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary, the young consort’s career did not begin until her husband’s succession to the throne in November 1916, but it continued as her son’s regent-in-exile in the inter-war years. Her...
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  5. What the British Invented by Gilly Pickup

    My latest book, What the British Invented – From the Great to the Downright Bonkers, was a delight to research and write. Of course before I started out on the task, I knew that as Brits we are a remarkably creative bunch, but I didn’t quite realise the extent of our inventiveness until I actually started to write. An 1851...
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  6. Edward IV - Glorious Son of York by Jeffrey James

    Perhaps no English king fought harder for the throne than King Edward IV, personified by Shakespeare as ‘this Sun of York’; an allusion to the three suns which are said to have risen in splendour prior to the Battle of Mortimer’s Cross, near Hereford, fought on 2 or 3 February 1461, a perceived supernatural display seen by Edward as a...
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  7. Secret Barnstaple - What is a Secret? by Elizabeth Hammett

    When asked to write a book with ‘Secret’ in the title (Secret Barnstaple in this case), one of my first thoughts was to wonder what ‘secret’ meant in this context. Obviously if an event was really ‘secret’ neither I nor anyone else would know about, so it would be rather difficult to write a book on the subject! The war...
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  8. Secret Ipswich: Three Remarkable Women by Susan Gardiner

    Writing a book with the title Secret Ipswich meant that I had to avoid the inclusion of too many famous people from the town so that I could concentrate on the more obscure people and places that are also part of its history. Ipswich's connections with Thomas Wolsey, Lord Nelson and two England football managers, Sir Alf Ramsey and Sir...
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  9. Don Kenyon His Own Man by Tim Jones

    Don Kenyon was a ’leader of champions and a champion of leaders’ for good reason; he was his own man and did things his own way. Known as ‘Braddy’ at school - like Don Bradman - he would bat for long periods without getting out. He still holds the record as the youngest player to score a century in the...
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  10. Meet the Great British Eccentrics by Steven Tucker

    To celebrate the publication of his new book Great British Eccentrics, author SD Tucker provides some edited highlights from the lives of three of Britain’s most lovable lunatics ... That Magnificent Madman with his Flying Machine Charles Waterton, the Squire of Walton Hall in Yorkshire, was a prominent nineteenth-century naturalist who developed the strange belief that he could fly. He...
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