Amberley Blog

  1. The Romans in 100 Facts by Jem Duducu

    In the classic comedy The Life of Brian in it the Monty Python team have the classic sketch ‘So what have the Romans ever done for us?’ In it innovations such as roads, aqueducts and schooling are raised (and then dismissed). It's the perfect summary of Rome's greatest achievement which is PR. I say this because in reality, the Romans...
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  2. Erotic Postcards of the Early Twentieth Century by Nigel Sadler

    Sometimes research takes you onto a peculiar and unexpected path. Back in 2013 I started to work on the book Ottery St Mary Through Time. During this research some of the postcards led me into looking more deeply into the First World War, resulting in the publication The First World War: The Postcard Collection. One of the postcards used in...
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  3. The history of the Sunderland Cottages by Michael Johnson

    Sunderland’s unique Victorian homes are examined in a new book. Architectural historian Michael Johnson has published a major study of the distinctive ‘Sunderland cottages’ that opened the door to homeownership for the town’s hardworking families. Britain’s towns and cities experienced a dramatic rise in population during the 19th century, as people came seeking work in emerging industries. In many parts...
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  4. The secret history of Chislehurst by Joanna Friel

    What has Chislehurst and the island of St Helena got in common? Not a question often posed but one curious fact that gave rise to my writing Secret Chislehurst. Both places have empty Napoleonic tombs! The body of Napoleon Bonaparte was exhumed and reinterred at Les Invalides in Paris in 1840, nearly 20 years after the former Emperors’ death. In...
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  5. Dining with the Victorians Daily Express feature by Emma Kay

    Making a meal of it: How the Victorians influenced your eating habits From a cooked breakfast to our love of curries, many of Britain's familiar culinary habits were invented by the Victorians as a new book reveals. Dining With The Victorians explores the impact they had on our eating habits today SUPERSTITIONS Many Victorians had an inexplicable obsession with the...
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  6. The Georgian Kitchen by Emma Kay

    I wrote the Georgian Kitchen to tell the story of my conviction in Britain’s cooking culture forming during this period. This was a time of extraordinary change in Britain, when the country became a vastly powerful world entity; a wealthy, extravagant and culinary rich nation. Conflict, poverty and sea power led many migrants to British shores. As well as importing...
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  7. Dining with the Victorians by Emma Kay

    Dining with the Victorians explores the narrative of the history of cooking, eating, wining and dining in this fact packed follow-up to Dining with the Georgians, my first book that defined Britain’s contemporary culinary history as being largely established in the eighteenth century. Whereas the Georgians gave us celebrity chef culture, a recipe writing mass media and a culinary consumerist...
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  8. The Empress, the War and the Old Boy Network by Gareth Russell

    In political terms, the life of Zita of Bourbon-Parma was one of the great, if noble, failures in European history. To date the last Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary, the young consort’s career did not begin until her husband’s succession to the throne in November 1916, but it continued as her son’s regent-in-exile in the inter-war years. Her...
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  9. What the British Invented by Gilly Pickup

    My latest book, What the British Invented – From the Great to the Downright Bonkers, was a delight to research and write. Of course before I started out on the task, I knew that as Brits we are a remarkably creative bunch, but I didn’t quite realise the extent of our inventiveness until I actually started to write. An 1851...
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  10. Edward IV - Glorious Son of York by Jeffrey James

    Perhaps no English king fought harder for the throne than King Edward IV, personified by Shakespeare as ‘this Sun of York’; an allusion to the three suns which are said to have risen in splendour prior to the Battle of Mortimer’s Cross, near Hereford, fought on 2 or 3 February 1461, a perceived supernatural display seen by Edward as a...
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