Amberley Blog

  1. The Wars of the Roses by John Ashdown-Hill

    History is full of myths – and a prime example is the so-called WARS OF THE ROSES - a name which has now become so well-known that it is difficult to avoid using it, but a name which was only invented two or three hundred years after the event it purports to describe. The traditional story of THE WARS OF THE...
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  2. Erotic postcards of the early 20th century - BBC Historyextra feature

    By the early 20th century, hundreds of thousands of images had become available showing women in varying degrees of undress. Printed with postcard backs, in Britain the trade in these erotic cards was hidden, and they were often sold ‘under the counter’ in tobacconists, newsagents and bookshops... But, as Nigel Sadler reveals in his new book, in earlier years the aim...
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  3. The Bristol Avon by Steve Wallis

    I am not a very good tourist. I find it difficult just to go somewhere and enjoy looking around for its own sake – I need an added purpose like taking photos to show to friends or colleagues. So writing a book about the Bristol Avon was ideal for me – between January and August of this year I got...
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  4. Great British Eccentrics - BBC History magazine feature

    Great British Eccentrics: 7 of the most peculiar people in history From the Scottish physician who pronounced lobsters as being capable of love and ‘damned crabs’ as having hearts of stone, to the peculiar aristocrat who invented a tiny gun for shooting wasps, Britain has long been a stronghold of eccentricity and peculiar behaviour In his new book, Great British Eccentrics...
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  5. Eleanor of Castile by Sara Cockerill - Medievalists.net feature

    Eleanor of Castile, the remarkable woman behind England’s greatest medieval king, Edward I, has been effectively airbrushed from history; yet she had one of the most fascinating lives of any of England’s queens. Her childhood was spent in the centre of the Spanish reconquest and was dominated by her military hero of a father (St Ferdinand) and her prodigiously clever...
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  6. The Georgians: things you may not know - Britain Magazine feature

    Think you know the Georgians? Check out these weird and wonderful facts about the people who lived during an age of great social and political change, from Mike Rendell’s new book, The Georgians in 100 Facts. The Georgian era is known for its lavish fashions and sumptuous food, as well as being a time of great social and political change. It...
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  7. An Illustrated Introduction to the Regency by Mike Rendell

    When I was asked to write “An Illustrated Introduction to the Georgians” I jumped at the chance. I had never written a book which was part of a series, and which had to fit in to an existing format in terms of length, number and use of images, and so on. Getting upwards of seventy images, all free of copyright...
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  8. The Romans in 100 Facts by Jem Duducu

    In the classic comedy The Life of Brian in it the Monty Python team have the classic sketch ‘So what have the Romans ever done for us?’ In it innovations such as roads, aqueducts and schooling are raised (and then dismissed). It's the perfect summary of Rome's greatest achievement which is PR. I say this because in reality, the Romans...
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  9. Erotic Postcards of the Early Twentieth Century by Nigel Sadler

    Sometimes research takes you onto a peculiar and unexpected path. Back in 2013 I started to work on the book Ottery St Mary Through Time. During this research some of the postcards led me into looking more deeply into the First World War, resulting in the publication The First World War: The Postcard Collection. One of the postcards used in...
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  10. The history of the Sunderland Cottages by Michael Johnson

    Sunderland’s unique Victorian homes are examined in a new book. Architectural historian Michael Johnson has published a major study of the distinctive ‘Sunderland cottages’ that opened the door to homeownership for the town’s hardworking families. Britain’s towns and cities experienced a dramatic rise in population during the 19th century, as people came seeking work in emerging industries. In many parts...
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