Amberley Blog

  1. Edinburgh's Leith Docks 1970-80 by Malcolm Fife

    In the late 1960’s I was interested in aviation, and I purchased a camera to record my visits to airports and air shows. Not long after, I decided I did not wish to restrict myself to photographing a single subject, and I began to build up a collection of colour slides on shipping. Leith Docks, on the northern edge of...
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  2. Bristol Pubs by James MacVeigh

    ‘There is nothing which has been contrived by Man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn.’  Dr Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) Like King Street where it stands, the Llandoger Trow pub is distinctive and quirky, both architecturally and in the richness of its history. (Bristol Pubs, Amberley Publishing) Why would anyone decide to write...
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  3. East End Jewish Cemeteries by Louis Berk

    An Oasis in Whitechapel - East End Jewish Cemeteries I am a secondary school teacher, and since 2004, I have worked at a school in Brady Street, in the heart of Whitechapel. I did not realise until I was looking out of a second story window one day that my school adjoins one of the oldest Jewish Cemeteries in the...
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  4. Planet Locomotive - A Fireman’s Life for me by Anthony Dawson

    The life and day-to-day tasks of a locomotive fireman has not changed since Richard Trevithick invented his self-propelled kettle in 1803. As a Railway Volunteer at the Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester – on part of the site of the Liverpool Road terminus of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway, opened in 1830 –  I have the privilege to work...
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  5. The Hooligans Are Still Among Us by Michael Layton

    The scourge of football-related violence has been with us since the 1960s, and came to the fore during the 70s and 80s, before the use of CCTV and other pro-active measures started the fight back by police and the authorities. The so-called ‘beautiful game’ has served to enrich the way of life for many generations in the UK and abroad...
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  6. The Kitchen Garden by Caroline Ikin

    When visiting historic gardens I’m always drawn to the walls.  A high brick wall – too high to look over, and with no openings to peer through – offers a tantalising clue to what lies beyond: the kitchen garden. What was once the bustling hub of the working garden is now often left derelict, grassed over, converted to a private...
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  7. Space Oddities by S. D. Tucker

    In an extract from his new book Space Oddities: Our Strange Attempts to Explain the Universe, author SD Tucker remembers the life of Hans Hörbiger - the forgotten Austrian astronomer who claimed that stars didn’t exist, and spied giant ice-cubes floating in space. THE ICEMAN COMETH The next time you cast your eyes up towards the Milky Way some clear...
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  8. The Early Railways of Manchester by Anthony Dawson

    The construction of the controversial Ordsall Chord in Manchester, enabling through-running between Piccadilly Station and Victoria, is the result of how the first railways came to Manchester in the 1830s and 1840s. It is rather ironic that, whilst the Liverpool & Manchester Railway was the world’s first inter-city passenger railway, its taciturn reluctance to work with other companies left Manchester...
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  9. Doctor Who Memorabilia by Paul Berry

    Doctor Who is not only one of Britain's most famous television programmes, it has also spawned more collectables than any other British TV character. For over 50 years the BBC have been licensing products based on the series, and my new book: Doctor Who Memorabilia takes you through the history of Doctor Who merchandising. Authors collection I have been collecting...
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  10. Corvette: The Rise of a Sports Car by Mark Eaton

    For many people, a car is just a tool to get them around which is a pity because not only is it a very expensive tool , but this very complicated piece of, quite frankly, amazing engineering gives them the potential of freedom that nothing else can, both of which seems to be lost on them. Kevin Warrington asks, in...
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