Amberley Blog

  1. Classic Trucks by Roy Dodsworth

    Published in 2017, as the titles suggest this book is about trucks, wagons, lorries or commercials. Each of the four words means the same but varies in regions. In the letters pages of Trucks, Wagons, Lorries or Commercials magazines there is regular argument about which is correct. Example the 70+ year old strongly argues that he, sometimes she, was a...
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  2. Who Betrayed the Jews? The realities of Nazi persecution in the Holocaust by Agnes Grunwald-Spier

    When I was writing about Holocaust Rescuers I was overwhelmed by the courage and generosity of spirit of the rescuers. However, there was one person who really shocked me and that was a Belgian traitor called Prosper de Zitter who betrayed members of the resistance and allied airmen trying to get home. I wondered how he could deliberately lead someone...
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  3. Photographing Models and Miniatures by Paul Brent Adams

    Once upon a time, models photography was hard work, and required some fairly sophisticated and expensive equipment, even for basic shots. This usually meant a 35 mm Single Lens Reflex camera. Today, a small and cheap digital compact camera is capable of producing high quality close-up photographs, without the need for any extra lenses or other special equipment. The cameras...
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  4. Diesels at Doncaster by Andrew Walker

    How long is thirty-five years? Is it a long time or a short time? If you are a teenager then it probably seems like an age. You associate it with old people. If however you are an old person, or even a middle-aged person, it may not seem that long. I am a middle-aged person. I used to think thirty-five...
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  5. The First Atlantic Liner: Brunel's Great Western Steamship by Helen Doe

    Researching Brunel’s first Atlantic liner, the Great Western, has raised some intriguing images. Her launch was quite a spectacle. Built in Bristol and mostly fitted out in Bristol, it carried great hopes of a new era in transatlantic commerce. This extract from the book describes the launch and the generous quantities of Madeira with which she was baptised by Mrs...
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  6. Kilmarnock The Postcard Collection by Frank Beattie

    Exploring the history of Kilmarnock through postcards. The influence of postcards on our culture should not be underestimated. They are part of our social history. The phrase ‘wish you were here’ is a common enough expression that grew out of sending postcards home from holiday. Most people now associate postcards with holidays, but it wasn’t always like that. Britain’s first...
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  7. A Passion for Public Parks – Why Parks Matter by Paul Rabbitts

    I recently published (2016) ‘Great British Parks: A Celebration’ which very much started out as a straightforward celebration of Great British Parks and followed by in 2017 ‘Parkitecture – Buildings and Monuments of Public Parks’ The grand entrance to Birkenhead Park – a fitting monument to the legacy of our great British parks. (Great British Parks, Amberley Publishing) Parks were...
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  8. Death Diary - A Year of London Murder, Execution, Terrorism and Treason by Gary Powell

    Murder is a fascinating subject; one only has to look at the popularity of the crime genre in both literature and television. All elements of the crime, be it human or scientific, are placed under a microscope by the crime writer for the reader or viewers benefit including: motive, DNA, fingerprints, entomology, ballistics, post mortems, conspiracy theories, bent cops, the...
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  9. Voices of the Flemish Waffen-SS – The final testament of the Oostfronters by Jonathan Trigg

    Our fascination with facts and voices of the Second World War is as strong as ever, and it remains the most popular historical period for authors and readers alike. That fascination has partly been fed by the living reminders of the war that walk around with us every day – the veterans themselves – men and women for whom the...
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  10. Docker's Daimlers by Richard Townsend

    Following a destructive and expensive world war it took Britain the rest of the 1940s and the best part of the fifties to achieve a stable peacetime economy. Daimlers experiences during this period were somewhat peculiar, though influenced by circumstances which were common to the rest of the motor industry. Taking the common background first, the UK economy was harnessed...
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