Amberley Blog

  1. The Seventies Railway by Greg Morse

    My earliest memory of the real railway is of the prototype High Speed Train plunging under a bridge near my Swindon home, but I got a much better look later in 1975 when a certain D1023 brought a long (long!) freight to a stand at the station while I was there with my Mum and Dad. A Class 46 on...
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  2. The Sultans by Jem Duducu

    The Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Rulers and Their World: A 600-Year History The Ottoman Empire is a topic that raises eyebrows. In some countries, it is a legacy best forgotten; in others, it is a hotly-debated topic and, in a handful, national pride has been nailed to this vital part of their history. Putting aside all the nationalist...
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  3. The Royal Marines and the War at Sea 1939-45 by Martin Watts

    As an academic historian and lecturer this is the first time that I have written for a general readership as well as a specialist audience with my new book The Royal Marines and the War at Sea 1939-45. History, in popular culture and media, has enjoyed something of a renaissance over the past twenty five years, and I think this...
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  4. Joan of Arc and 'The Great Pity of the Land of France' by Moya Longstaffe

    The facts of Joan of Arc’s life are (and always have been) well known, established beyond dispute. Her life and death are fully documented from childhood to her very public execution in Rouen. Both in the chronicles of the time and above all in the verbatim proceedings of the two trials. The first of which (1431, Rouen) condemned her and...
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  5. Cave Canem: Animals and Roman Society by Iain Ferris

    My newly-published Amberley book presents a broad analysis of the place and role of animals in ancient Roman society and their meaning and significance is interpreted in cultural terms. Animals were highly significant and important in the Roman world and in the Roman imagination. Most obviously, there would have been working animals on the majority of Roman farms and animals...
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  6. Abandoned Villages by Stephen Fisk

    I retired in 2003. Having worked as a clinical psychologist I left with no plans at all for the future, but reasonably confident that new interests and activities would soon begin to come along. One of my biggest interests since then has been the abandoned villages of Britain. Some of the farmhouses at Cosmeston. The nearest building on the right...
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  7. Space Exploration by Carolyn Collins Petersen

    What does it take to build a space-faring society? That's the question I wanted to answer in my book "Space Exploration: Past, Present, and Future". When the editors at Amberley first approached me about doing a history of space exploration, I looked at just what sort of story I could tell in 110,000 or so words. I did a lot...
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  8. Frost Fairs to Funfairs by Allan Ford and Nick Corble

    In an age when most of us are saturated with entertainment options, with many of them focused on staying inside and/or staring at a screen of some kind, it’s perhaps not surprising that the future of the funfair is once again being put into question. Once again? Well, this is a familiar situation for the showmen who dedicate their lives...
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  9. The Tudor Dynasty by Terry Breverton

    Non-fiction writing is all about fascination – learning intriguing facts and delving to find what is true, misguided or simply wrong. It’s a voyage of discovery but where you have to divest preconceived notions and query everything as you go along. The problem with historical non-fiction is that much material has been hidden, or hijacked with a predictable slant to...
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  10. The Natal Campaign - 'Humanitarian aid from Africa to Britain' and 'Slavery' by Hugh Rethman

    Humanitarian aid from Africa to Britain Did you know that there was a time when Africa donated financial humanitarian aid to Britain? (The Natal Campaign: A Sacrifice Betrayed, Amberley Publishing) At the beginning of 1900 Ladysmith was besieged and the relieving British and Colonial force was struggling to break the siege. Aware of the suffering being inflicted on the Army...
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