Amberley Blog

  1. Huddersfield Trolleys and Buses by Michael Berry

    A World away! In the far off days of the Huddersfield Trolley era, the “boom” wasn’t just the pole sticking out at the top of the bus – the whole industry was “booming”! Cars were a limited luxury few could afford – or needed for that matter. Some trolley services in the more populated parts of the boroughs had something...
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  2. Zealots by Oliver Thomson

    Zealots - How a Group of Scottish Conspirators unleashed half a Century of War in Britain When I first thought of this book a couple of years ago I was going to call it Scottish Jihad, for Islamic Jihads were all in the news and I was curious to see how religious fanatics in 17th century Britain compared with those...
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  3. Secret Luton and Secret Bedford by Paul Adams

    Writing a local history book would appear to be a reasonably straightforward task. If you know your area and your subject then the book almost writes itself. For the two titles that I have contributed to Amberley’s ‘Secret Towns’ series – Secret Luton which appeared in 2017 and Secret Bedford which is published July 2018 – I found that things...
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  4. Road Rollers by Anthony Coulls

    It takes a certain kind of madness to preserve road rollers, either steam, diesel or petrol powered. All are heavy and awkward and the amount of time, effort and money expended upon restoration or repairs is not reflected in the value of the machine at the end of the work. Yet it’s still fun, and the roller folk are a...
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  5. Phillimore's Edinburgh by Jan Bondeson

    Reginald Phillimore was born in 1855, one of five children of Dr William Phillimore, the superintendent of a lunatic asylum near Nottingham. He showed promise as an artist already as a schoolboy, winning a Government Art Prize for the painting of a still life group in watercolour, from nature. After a third-class Oxford B.A. in history, he worked as an...
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  6. British Railway Accidents and Incidents in Maps and Pictures by Jonathan Mountfort

    I became immediately hooked on the study of railway accidents when, at the age of ten, I borrowed J A B Hamilton’s British Railway Accidents of the 20th Century from my local public library – I think I read it five times in the next couple of weeks. But I can’t really explain why that should be – I’m not...
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  7. The British Seaside by Stuart Hylton

    I didn’t always like to be beside the seaside For most of us, our stock of childhood memories include visits to the seaside. Hopefully, most of these memories will be happy ones, but the sea was not always the welcoming haunt of the holidaymaker. Going back to Old Testament times, the sea could be seen as the bringer of death...
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  8. Everyday Life in Tudor London by Stephen Porter

    Tudor London was a large and vibrant city holding an unrivalled position within England as the centre of government, political life and the law; the focus of power and patronage; the hub of overseas and inland trade, with a diverse and flourishing economy. Its wealth and the opportunities which it offered drew aspiring incomers from across the country and attracted...
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  9. Bell Rock Lighthouse by Michael A. W. Strachan

    More than Stevenson and Rennie When I was first approached by my Amberley editor regarding the possibility of writing a book about the Bell Rock Lighthouse my almost immediate answer was absolutely not. In my view there had been enough books written about the Bell Rock, most of which were nothing more than edited versions of Robert Stevenson’s 1824 Account...
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  10. Cumbria in Photographs by Steve Pipe

    Cumbria through the seasons Each year Cumbria sees in excess of 15 million visitors and many of them come between Easter and October, which is a shame as Cumbria is a county of year round beauty. This ever changing beauty is something I tried to show in my Cumbria in Photographs book; capturing the colours and the activities is less...
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