Military History

  1. Barbarossa Through German Eyes by Jonathan Trigg

    Was butter the real reason Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa to conquer the Soviet Union? Napoleon Bonaparte allegedly once said “An army marches on its’ stomach”, but to paraphrase him there is a strong case to say that the Germans who invaded the Soviet Union in 1941 were “an Army marching for its stomach.” Ever since the Nazis launched the largest...
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  2. Secret World of Chester’s John Dolphin by Adrian and Dawn L. Bridge

    The role of technical experts such as engineers, scientists, and mathematicians in modern warfare, is often indispensable. John Robert Vernon Dolphin, born in 1905 in the small village of Christleton, just outside Chester, was just such a technical expert. He was born into a well-to-do scientific family, with a father who worked as a metallurgist for a copper refining company...
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  3. Life in Military Intelligence During the Falklands War by Nick van der Bijl

    Military Intelligence can be divided into two principal elements. Operational Intelligence is the pro-active provision of strategic and operational capabilities in time to be of use. Intelligence is widely used, for instance the scout checking out an opposing team, businesses assessing competitors and conducting a medical check on a patient claiming an ailment. The trick is to convert that information...
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  4. Through Adversity - 'Lives of Three Operational Pilots' by Alastair Goodrum

    The Story of Life in the RFC and RAF Through Three Operational Pilots My seventh and latest book tells the stories of three pilots from widely differing places: Lincolnshire, Warwickshire and South Africa, and social backgrounds: sons of a country JP, a market gardener and a vet. They are typical of the composition of the RAF and their individual military...
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  5. Surrey's Military Heritage by Paul Le Messurier

    Canadian troops riot in Epsom, Surrey in June 1919 Just over one hundred years ago, the First World War officially came to an end with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on the 28 June 1919. The brutally of combat had ended the previous year following the armistice of 11 November 1918. Yet sadly, in the same month that...
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  6. Police in Nazi Germany by Paul Garson

    The Third Reich officially ended with the signing of the unconditional surrender on May 7, 1945, only after Nazi Germany had been reduced to a smoldering heap of ashes, its borders breached by the Allies from the west and the Soviet Army from the east. Although Hitler and Goebbels were dead by suicide in the Berlin Fuhrerbunker, his henchmen sought...
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  7. The Great Scuttle by David Meara

    The End of the German High Seas Fleet Witnessing History One hundred years ago last summer an extraordinary and dramatic event took place, a coda to the end of the First World War. The scuttle of the German High Seas Fleet in Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands, on 21st June 1919, Midsummer’s Day was the greatest single loss of...
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  8. Photographers of the Third Reich by Paul Garson

    Images from the Wehrmacht, Third Reich What is it about photos that mesmerize us? When even life and death enemies find themselves smiling for their captor’s camera. A group of army officers struggle with various types of cameras, likely in France. (Photographers of the Third Reich, Amberley Publishing) What power do these images hold that in some cases linger with...
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  9. School of Aces: The RAF Training School that Won the Battle of Britain by Alastair Goodrum

    My latest book, School of Aces (Amberley; 2019), tells the story of how RAF Fighter Command prepared for battle. It takes an in-depth view of the creation and development of its premier fighter pilot and air gunnery school, located at RAF Sutton Bridge. This station is where, for example, the RAF prepared for the air Battles of France and Britain...
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  10. Boulton Paul Defiant by Alec Brew

    The Myths of the Boulton Paul Defiant The aircraft most associated with Wolverhampton’s Boulton Paul Aircraft Ltd, and the Black Country’s highest profile contribution to the Second World War, was the Defiant turret fighter. It fought over the beaches of Dunkirk, two squadrons fought in the Battle of Britain, and then, during the dark nights of the Blitz, it was...
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