Amberley Publishing - Transport, Military, Local and General History

Secret Greenwich by David C. Ramzan Book Signing

Author of Secret Greenwich with James Rose of the Plume of Feathers Greenwich.

A Sign of the Times - Secret Greenwich book signing at the Plume of Feathers Greenwich

On 5th November I carried out a book signing of my publication Secret Greenwich at the Plume of Feathers, Greenwich, a 17th century public house that features in the book. The licensee’s, Sue Rose and her son James, publicised the book signing during the previous week, placing leaflets and posters throughout the bars. On my arrival in the afternoon I was pleasantly surprised to find the Plume, as the public house is referred to locally, extremely busy. Although I must admit they were not all there specifically for my book signing, as the Plume serves an excellent selection of home cooked cuisine. Also many arriving during the afternoon after a stroll in the park or along the river path then heading for the historic hostelry for a light lunch or a splendid Sunday roast.

Whitefield’s Mount, reputedly the burial place of Cornish Rebels, and the last army of Celts to march upon London.

I settled myself into a cosy corner of the bar where I put out a display of books and posters on the table, then handed out ‘Did You Know’ fact sheets containing brief but fascinating historical points of interest about Greenwich, a sample of narrative from within the book. Soon after setting up I had my pen out signing copies of Secret Greenwich, the first books sold to invited friends and acquaintances, shortly followed by many locals coming over to my table throughout the evening to buy a copy. Recalling times gone by and how the landscape of Greenwich has changed, new modern structures gradually surrounded many of the town’s historic and celebrated buildings.

The Plume of Feathers, Greenwich’s earliest existing public house.

Two of my friends, retiring to Cornwall a few years ago, travelled up from the West Country for the book signing, although they were also spending a long weekend with their son and daughter who both still live locally, the expatriate couple revisiting the place where they first met, the Plume of Feathers. After reminiscing about their first encounter which led to a long happy marriage, our conversation turned to an historic link between Cornwall and Greenwich, an account featuring in my book. Of the time when Cornish rebels marched upon London in 1497 to come up against the awaiting forces of Henry VII, after which an estimated two-thousand Celts were killed at the Battle of Deptford Bridge, their corpses rumoured to have been buried under Whitefield’s Mount on nearby Blackheath.

The Plume of Feathers, situated to the east of the Meridian Line on the one time main highway through Greenwich, a countryside style pub in a suburban setting, was an ideal location for my book signing. The atmospheric hostelry is frequented not only by many long-standing local residents, but also by others recently moving to Greenwich and Blackheath, along with visitors and tourists who come across the Plume while exploring the quiet secluded back roads away from the busy town centre. Many of those at the book signing, although aware of the royal riverside town’s distinguished history, were unaware of many secret places, tales and buildings from Greenwich’s past, and hopefully those at the book signing who were kind enough to purchase a copy will discover more fascinating facts and interesting anecdotes contained within the pages of Secret Greenwich.

David C. Ramzan's book Secret Greenwich is available for purchase now.