Before I forget, may I first put in a good word for Editor Jenny Stephens. She has been a star for my work on Secret Chester. It is the first time I have done this format, and there were many tricky moments. However, Jenny sailed through and put the book together in admirable form.  She juggled the images and the text in a way which brings out the pictures; some larger, some smaller; and also a good word for the printers; some of the pictures I was doubtful about, but the printers have done a sterling job, bringing out some details I could not see on the originals. The picture of Godstall Lane on page 7 for instance; very dark in the original but a great deal less so when printed. The paper is excellent quality and does good justice to the images; they are printed much better than I expected.

Godstall Lane had a hermit. Gerald of Wales wrote that this man was Hnry V of the Holy Roman Empire. (Secret Chester, Amberley Publishing)

Well, there are lots of books on Chester, some of them with archive pictures, but I am hoping there is only one like mine. With new pictures and short explanatory text, it’s reliable and accurate but not academic. The mixture looks good to me; some history, some contemporary; some quirky things, like ‘gee-gees’ being derived from a Mr Gee who started the racecourse in c1550. Then to various things about the Romans, and King Arthur, who seems to have spent some time in Chester. I have put in lots of pictures of houses. They are so attractive with their half-timbering and carvings and have odd things like John Lennon’s grandmother being born in one.

Gee gees dates back to the first recorded horse race at Chester in 1539. (Secret Chester, Amberley Publishing)

It is an outstanding place; packed with good details. The French restaurant Chez Jules used to be the Fire Station, and you can see the bays.

Not many know that the design side is misleading. Most of the half-timbering, Tudor-style, is fairly new; Victorian; designed in 1850-1890. I have dedicated the book to five architects; such good fortune to have them there at the same time. They really were outstanding designers and without them the city would be a pale shadow of what it is now. The buildings have survived time; some from the very early centuries are still fresh and good-looking.

Chez Jules restaurant in Northgate Street. (Secret Chester, Amberley Publishing)

I think this combination of quality pictures of a decent size, with illustrative text, is a good commercial idea. I think people, tourists especially, will buy it; it is a souvenir of a visit perhaps. Very good news that genuine paper books are coming back and e-based material is in decline. On holiday in Spain last week I noticed fewer kindles around the pool and more books.

I sincerely wish Amberley Publishing all success. They are taking a chance in a difficult marketplace. They are producing decent books of good quality content and material. I would like to mention Alan Murphy as well; as commissioning editor, he has excellent judgement and looks to the future in a very positive way.

John Idris Jones' book Secret Chester is available for purchase now.